AdobeStock_350931657.jpeg

Equinor oil drilling will destroy the climate and
threaten marine life. 

AdobeStock_347554946_edited.jpg

30,000,000

tonnes of carbon dioxide per year

200,000

barrels of oil per day

36

days or longer to clean up a major oil spill 

A terrible idea.

Equinor's Bay du Nord is a deepwater offshore oil drilling project that, if built, will produce up to 73 million barrels per year for 30 years, equivalent to adding 7-10 million fossil fuel cars to the road or building 8-10 new coal power plants. This is in direct opposition to recommendations in the International Energy Agency’s (IEA)  groundbreaking Roadmap to Net Zero and 1.5°C World Energy Outlook scenario to stop the expansion of oil, gas and coal production and infrastructure and escalate the global transition away from fossil fuel dependence and toward renewable energy. 

The time to stop the expansion of oil and gas production is now. Eleven countries and subnational governments have launched Beyond Oil and Gas Alliance, committing to no new expansion of oil and gas. In addition, 2800 scientists, 101 Nobel Laureates as well as 170 parliamentarians from 33 countries, including many from Canada, have endorsed the principles of a Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty. And at COP 26, Canada joined almost 40 countries in committing to end international public financing for fossil fuels, putting the future of the industry further at risk.

Equinor talks big game on sustainability — it even released an "energy transition" plan in 2022. But drilling for oil in a sensitive, biodiverse environment goes against climate science and environmental protection. An oil spill would take at least 36 days to clean up, and the impact on marine life would be catastrophic. In addition, the project is not economically necessary and investing in community-based renewable energy is a much better option for the climate and economy.

 

Join the movement to demand Equinor cancel the destructive Bay du Nord project and invest in safe, renewable energy for Canadian communities instead.

20150815-GULY8409_edited.jpg